Many HIV-Infected Cancer Patients Lacking Treatment

By David Sampson

Gita Suneja, M.D.

A new study finds HIV-infected patients with cancer in the United States appear to be less likely to receive cancer treatment, regardless of insurance and other existing health conditions. The study, by researchers at the University of Utah, National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society,

Cancer is an increasingly common cause of morbidity and mortality among individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In the United States, cancer incidence rates in this population have increased since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Cancer is now the second most common cause of death among HIV-infected individuals, after AIDS-related deaths.

While previous studies have shown that cancer patients who are infected with HIV are less likely to receive cancer treatment compared with HIV-uninfected individuals, whether that was due to insurance status and other conditions was largely unstudied.

Gita Suneja, M.D.

For the new study, researchers led by Gita Suneja, MD, MSHP, from the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Utahused the National Cancer Data Base to study non-elderly adults diagnosed with ten common cancers from 2003 to 2011. They examined associations between HIV status and lack of cancer treatment, taking into account insurance status and comorbidities.

After adjusting for those two known predictors of lack of treatment, the disparity remained for all cancers studied, except anal cancer. HIV-infected patients were more likely to lack cancer treatment for cancers of the head and neck (relative risk [RR] = 1.48); upper gastrointestinal tract (RR = 2.62); colorectum (RR = 1.70); lung (RR = 2.46); breast (RR = 2.14); cervix (RR = 2.81); prostate (RR = 2.16); Hodgkin lymphoma (RR = 1.92); and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (RR = 1.82).

The authors say factors that predicted a lack of cancer treatment among HIV-infected individuals varied by tumor type (solid tumor …read more

Source:: American Cancer Society